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CHOP/Penn T Cell Therapy Results in the Media

Dr. Stephan Grupp and the Penn Medicine research team presented the latest results of the CART19/CTL019 trials for patients adult and pediatric patients with CLL and ALL during this weekend's ASH Meeting.

Coverage of their story has appeared in several media outlets. Please check back frequently for updates!

Gene therapy scores big wins against blood cancers (Associated Press, December 8, 2013).
Killing Cancer Like the Common Cold (CNN, December 9, 2013).
Penn study confirms T-cell effectiveness on leukemia (Philadelphia Inquirer, December 9, 2013).

2013 WebMD 2013 Health Heroes features Dr. Stephan Grupp

The WebMD Health Heroes awards celebrate those who recognized a need for change, pushed past adversity, and were able to health inspire others in meaningful ways. Dr. Grupp and his patient, Emily Whitehead, are featured for their remarkable story and her subsequent advocacy efforts for childhood cancer research programs.

To learn more about the 2013 WebMD Health Heroes, please visit the WebMD Magazine's Health Heroes page.

CHOP Cancer Center in the Media

Recently the CHOP Cancer Center has been featured in several medial outlets. Visit the links below for the stories featuring the incredible stories of our patients and physicians!

60 Minutes Australia: T Cell Therapy Story features Dr. Stephan Grupp and his T Cell therapy patients.

The Wall Street Journal highlights Dr. Jill Ginsberg and the growing field of fertility preservation in pediatric cancer patients.

Fox 29 features former CHOP patient and Parkway Run Ambassador, Antonio Santos. Read about Antonio's story and Give Forward campaign here.

Heroes for a Cure: Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation and Northwestern Mutual have partnered to raise money for pediatric cancer research. Their campaign features Drs. John Maris and Michael Hogarty and two of our patient-families.

The Courier-Post features CHOP Four Seasons Parkway Run ambassador Hailey. Read more about her story and the importance of funding for childhood cancer research.

Alix Seif featured in American Cancer Society's 100 Stories of Hope

The American Cancer Society is celebrating their 100th anniversary by highlighting the work of 100 people leading the fight against cancer. Dr. Seif and her team are featured in story #63.

CHOP Oncologist Leads First Pediatric Dream Team as Stand Up to Cancer and St. Baldrick’s Take Aim at Children’s Cancers

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, 267-426-6063 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A physician-researcher from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia will lead the first-ever pediatric “Dream Team” solely focused on creating new treatments for the most challenging childhood cancers. Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) and the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, along with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), SU2C’s scientific partner, announced this Dream Team today during a press conference at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013 in Washington, D.C.

Read more...

ASCO Honors CHOP Expert Garrett Brodeur with Pediatric Oncology Award and Lecture

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Phone: (267) 426-6063, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today announced it will confer one of its highest awards on pediatric oncologist Garrett M. Brodeur, M.D., of the Cancer Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Brodeur will receive the Pediatric Oncology Award and deliver the Pediatric Oncology Lecture on Friday, May 31 during the ASCO annual meeting in Chicago.

The Award and Lecture recognize “outstanding scientific work of major importance to the field of pediatric oncology” during the course of a career. Brodeur is an expert in neuroblastoma, the most common solid tumor of childhood.

A cancer of the peripheral nervous system that typically appears as a tumor in a child’s abdomen or chest, neuroblastoma varies greatly in severity, ranging from forms that spontaneously disappear to high-risk subtypes that are difficult to cure. Because of this variability, researchers have sought ways to predict the course of disease in order to select the most appropriate treatment for each patient. The underlying assumption of this approach is that better understanding of the biology of this cancer will allow pediatric oncologists to avoid undertreating or overtreating a child.

Over his career, Brodeur has focused on identifying the genes, proteins and biological pathways that give rise to neuroblastoma and drive its clinical behavior. He also has built on this knowledge to develop more effective and less toxic treatments for children by targeting specific pathways.

His research first demonstrated in the 1980s that when neuroblastoma cells developed multiple copies of the MYCN gene, a process called amplification, a high-risk subtype of neuroblastoma occurs, necessitating more aggressive treatment. This discovery ushered in the current era of genomic analysis of tumors, both in adult and pediatric oncology. Profiling specific molecular alterations in a given patient’s tumor helps oncologists to predict that patient’s outcome and select the most appropriate treatment.

Brodeur and his colleagues also identified deletions of important genes on chromosome 1 and on chromosome 11 as markers of high-risk neuroblastoma. He has collaborated with other CHOP researchers who identified the ALK gene as the gene responsible for most cases of hereditary neuroblastoma.

Another major focus of his research has concerned receptor tyrosine kinases, a family of signaling proteins that control the clinical behavior of neuroblastomas. His preclinical work led to a clinical trial with a novel drug that selectively blocks TRK signaling. He is now working on second-generation TRK inhibitors, as well as on nanoparticle delivery systems to treat patients more effectively, and with less toxicity.

Brodeur has been a member of the CHOP medical staff since 1993 and holds the Audrey E. Evans Endowed Chair in Pediatric Oncology at the Hospital. He also is a professor of Pediatrics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is an associate director of the Abramson Cancer Center. Before arriving at CHOP, Brodeur did his fellowship in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at St. Jude’s Children’s Research Center and a postdoctoral fellowship in Molecular Genetics at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where he remained until coming to CHOP.